Tagged: utility clothing

Exhibition: Austerity to Prosperity

Austerity to Prosperity Walsall Museum Black Country Echoes

I was honoured and excited when Walsall Museum invited me to take part in planning this exhibition. My brief was to select items from the Hodson Shop Collection that told the story of the transition from wartime austerity to the relative prosperity of the 1950s. The clothing in the collection fits perfectly within this tumultuous period and provides evidence of what Black Country women were wearing during the post-war period. There are the simple yet subduedly elegant utility (CC41) dresses that fade away as the 1950s get into full swing, with full skirts and vivid prints taking over.

My main aim was not to oversimplify the narrative of change; the myth that everyone woke up on 1st January 1950 to find that the drab wartime world had been replaced by a new consumer-driven technicolor dream world. The 1940s may have been a time of austerity but there was still colour, beauty and a booming demand for little luxuries such as lipstick and face powder. Conversely, the 1950s remained austere for many, with food rationing only coming to an end in 1954 (clothing rationing ended in 1949). I reflected this by choosing a few unusual items: a ‘Wartime emergency pack’ of face powder, a surprisingly frilly utility dress, a distinctly dreary wool jersey dress from the 1950s next to a full-skirted confection of a dress from the same time.

CC41 Utility wool jersey women's suit and rayon pussy bow neck dress

Utility items from the Hodson Shop Collection – creases have been kept in the dress as that is how it was discovered in the Hodson Shop.

Installing the exhibition was great fun and an excellent learning opportunity. I’m really proud of the end result, especially the bit that includes a 1950s twin-tub washing machine!

Purple CC41 Utility dress

Me getting to grips with the waist of a Utility dress! Image by Catherine Lister

1950s pearls and 1950s perfume 'Seventh Heaven'

An abundance of pearls and perfume from the 1950s.

The clothing accompanies a display of items manufactured or used in the Black Country during the period 1940-1960, again reflecting the aesthetic and ideals of the shift from austerity to prosperity. The exhibition is part of the region-wide Black Country Echoes festival and runs 3 Sept-10 Jan 2015. Admission is free.

Thanks to the team at Walsall Museum for providing me with this opportunity and supporting me along the way!

From Austerity to Prosperity

3 Sept 2014-10 Jan 2015

Community History Gallery, Walsall Museum, Lichfield Street, Walsall.

 

Advertisements